Values – The Focal Point of Good Writing

Values – The Focal Point of Good Writing

Diversity in life is the greatest thing people have in common. Diverse lives mean diverse values.  As a writer, if you want to relate to people and get them personally involved with your writing, challenge their values. Give your readers something to digest. I learned this principle with the first book I wrote. It is the most appreciated book in the Lil Quacker Series written for children. It is titled “Oldie Oldschool and the Chicks.” It is a comic parody of values. Its characters have different values from old to modern, conservative to liberal, men to women, and more. It looks at the crazy sides of them all with Oldie Oldschool teaching the chicks. The fun side of using values in your writing is looking at different viewpoints, lifestyles, and people. Situations always change the accepted norms of the value. What is commonplace now, will look absurd over time. By placing the value on unimportant things, a writer can safely examine it. For example, in Oldie Oldschool and the Chicks, all values were examined in the context of chickens becoming cowboys and cooks. It was a safe environment to discuss conservative and liberal values. It made it possible to laugh at both.

A writer who uses values as a writing tool has a few decisions to make. The writer needs to decide what writing device they will use with their values.

  1. Promote a value.

Everyone has different values. If a writer wants to entice different people to their beliefs, they need to get behind the values they believe and promote them in their writing. They need to stand on principal.

  • Oppose a value.

Sometimes a writer needs to stand up and oppose what they don’t believe. If you want to make your writing stand for something, people need to know where you stand.

  • Present opposing values. Show your reader where values clash. By presenting both sides of an issue, a writer can present conflict and move along their writing.
  • Be a distant observer. A writer can take a distant view from the issues and show the values in a clear picture from afar. People can see more clearly if they get the big picture.
  • Take a comic look at the values. A writer can look at different values in their extremes. An understanding of something can change when it is presented in its absurd extremes. Sometime the truth just looks funny. Humor is the best remedy to look at sensitive issues.

Once a writer decides the writing device to use, they must decide the point of view to use.

  1. Writer’s opinion. Is your writing going to be an opinion piece? Are you taking ownership?
  • Story piece. Is the writer going to use a story to show a casual view of the values.? Stories are very powerful.
  • Character values. Are the characters in your story going to posses the values? Do they portray the movement of the piece by their beliefs?

 By making these choices, a writer will be able to successfully use values as their focal point for good writing.

As a writer yourself, you might be asking why you would want to worry about values in your writing. I think the best reasons are:

  1. Relatability. A writer wants to relate with his audience. A writer must present something that a reader can relate with whether good or bad.

It brings up feelings that the reader has or opposes.

  • Interesting. Everyone has values. It is interesting to discuss what you believe. Most people have formed strong opinions that they can explore. Readers will remain interested in what you have to say.
  • Promotes writer’s conflict. The best way to move an article or story along is with conflict. It moves a story from one place to another, and from one level to another. Values naturally brings conflicts into any conversation or written piece. Everyone has an opinion and their opinion is right.
  • Provides an endless supply of writing material. In a world of media and writing, the idea pools for a lot of writing can be tough to tap. A writer does not just want to regurgitate the same ideas. Values provides endless interesting writing material.

The bottom line is this – If you want to practice good writing – Use values as your focal point in your writing. It will produce marvelous results in your writing process.

Oldie Oldschool and the Chicks autographed copy sold at https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheeOldePeddler .

The Art of Diligence in the Writing Process

The Art of Diligence in the Writing Process

It was always a dream of mine to write the great American novel. A dream in which I am not alone. Many of us want to captivate millions with a few dazzling words that move people.

One day I decided I would fulfill that dream. I figured that in a day or two I would be at the top of the writing world.

That is when I quickly discovered that writing is not a midnight miracle, but rather a long training for an Olympic event.  

It is not by any sense of the word, quick or easy.

My first real long novel was The Pixie Tales – The Gift. It was the first in a series in which I decided to write. It was from this experience I learned that writing takes diligence.

In an Olympic event training, it takes years of experience to develop your skill. Years of practice to use the skill, and massive effort to complete the event. All that, just for a chance that you might be noticed.

Writing is very similar. My first novel taught me that if you do not prepare, work, rework, re-prepare, and apply hours and effort, you will not have a chance to perhaps be noticed. What you do will have to be intentional or reworked.

I soon learned that the writing process looks something like this:

  1. Pre-planning stage. Decide on a topic, idea, genre, or subject to write on.
  2. Outline the project. You must get some idea where your going and how to get there.
  3. Drafting stage. You just need to put words on a page. You need something with which to work.
  4. Rewriting stage. Writing is rewriting. What you write rarely comes out perfect the first time.
  5. Content Editing. You need to get the plots, subplots, character development, and general structure right.
  6. Grammar editing. If you don’t communicate effectively, no one will want to wade through it.
  7. Proof reading. It just doesn’t always come out right the first few times.
  8. Critiquing. You must critique your work and let others critique it. It makes it stronger.
  9. Rewriting. Writing is rewriting,
  10. Formatting. You need to format the written word, and general layout.
  11. Tweaking. You must fix the little things and do the important things like the cover layout.
  12. Publishing. A book needs to be published if it is going to be a real book.
  13. Marketing and advertising. You have a book, but does anyone know about it? Marketing is just as important as writing if you want your book to be read.
  14.   Add-ons. If your book is part of a series, you need to write the rest of the books.
  15. More marketing and advertising.

This is not a midnight miracle. It takes diligence and work. I learned that a writer needs to be disciplined. I personally follow a simple plan.

  1. I set aside time to work in my writing.
  2. I create a plan for each project that sets aside time for each of the elements of the writing process.
  3. I work the plan one element at a time, in order so I do not get overwhelmed.
  4. I pick myself up and dust myself off every time I fall off the wagon. I start again where I left off.

Persistence and diligence win the game.

Why do it if it is difficult and hard? For each writer it is different, but for me it is because of the dream. I just can not walk away from my dream. I write because it helps me see the world and make sense of it. If I explore different sides of an issue in my writing, it clarifies it for me. If I explore values and opinions, character flaws and lofty ideals, it somehow makes them real and brings them home to me in my life. Writing gives understanding. It gives me the hope of seeing something clear enough that I might write those words on a page that matter. I might say something that is profound enough that someone will take notice. It is all about the dream.

My first novel taught me a lot about writing and the Olympic training process it takes to write. If you have a desire to write the next great American novel, or just put a few words of the page, remember that the intentional writing process takes a lot of work and a lot of diligence.

The Pixie Tales – The Gift autographed copy sold at https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheeOldePeddler .

The Freedom of an Art Journal

Goldfish by Kenneth Leon Roberts

The Freedom of an Art Journal

Artists have always had to practice, experiment, test, and create. It can be intimidating to do it in public. A new canvas or a sheet of art paper can seem like a gigantic view into your world. It is hard to put it all on the line.

A personal art journal for journaling can be a safer and more reassuring approach. Something no one will see but you. A secure place to put down your thoughts and ideas without the world seeing.

If something works out, you can always recreate it for the world to see your genius. With secure peace of mind, you can confidently go about setting the world on fire with your art.

Remember, you do not have to do it all for everyone to see. The freedom of an art journal can make sure of that.

Kenneth Leon Roberts – Artist

Illustrations sold at https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheeOldePeddler

The Hidden Value of Art

Tango by Kenneth Leon Roberts

The Hidden Value of Art

Creating art or admiring art has value that is far beyond the art itself. Some people call it by different names like art therapy or indulgent pleasure. I personally think that it should be called the hidden value of art. It is a well being tool that helps a person explore values and ideas that they might not be able to express or see in any other form. Exploring how you feel is important to such personal experiences as self-esteem, confidence, understanding feelings, exploring emotions, relieving stress, reducing anxiety, controlling depression or overcoming illness and disabilities. The hidden value of art includes many, many benefits. To be healed emotionally, physically, spiritually, or mentally is a miracle. Art can do it. For this hidden value art is of great importance in our lives.

Kenneth Leon Roberts – Artist

Illustrations sold at https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheeOldePeddler

A Personal View by an Artist.

Cherry Blossom and Teddy illustration by Kenneth Leon Roberts

A Personal View by an Artist.

Art appreciation is a term that requires knowing the different attributes of various art processes, qualities, time periods, styles and art techniques. It is an ability to appreciate the nuances of various art pieces.

As an artist, I view art appreciation in a little different light. I view it as a personal fondness of certain characteristics that appeal to me or my audience.

One art piece can be marvelous to one person and loathed by another. All as a matter of personal preference. To appreciate it without liking it requires a informed appreciation of the process.  A true sense of art appreciation.

Most art lovers, I feel do not go that far. They have their likes and dislikes based solely on emotion and feelings. For that reason, art appreciation in a broader sense is just personal preference.

As an artist, I always hope that someone will appreciate my work just because it speaks to them. The truest meaning of art appreciation.

Kenneth Leon Roberts – Artist

Illustrations sold at https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheeOldePeddler

Red Roses – The Story Behind the Art

Red Roses – The Story Behind the Art

This illustration “Red Roses” by Kenneth Leon Roberts is a representation of the traditional red rose. Red roses are the symbol of love, and they are a classical way of saying, “You are someone special.” Nothing says, “I love you” better in the night than a bouquet picked just for you.

Illustration sold at https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheeOldePeddler